Carbon balance in tundra under contemporary climate: significance of belowground net carbon fluxстатья

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Дата последнего поиска статьи во внешних источниках: 28 мая 2015 г.

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[1] Karelin D. V., Zamolodchikov D. G. Carbon balance in tundra under contemporary climate: significance of belowground net carbon flux // Doklady Biological Sciences. — 2014. — Vol. 458. — P. 286–288. Current trends in above-ground phytomass production and decomposition rates in tundra were studied (1996 – 2011) and modeled using regression-based equations. Following the warming in shrub tundra in North-Eastern Europe, both rates of production and decomposition rise. The decomposition rates are highest for the nitrogen-enriched compounds of phytomass, primarily for the leaves of shrubs and other vascular plants. Despite the higher decomposition rate, it does not compensate for increased phytomass production, which finally result in surface litter and debris accumulation during long-term period of observations. The above-ground carbon pool, accumulating increased amounts of living phytomass stands and dead plant mass, remains a stable sink of atmospheric CO2. Below-ground component of tundra net ecosystem flux was found to be a decreasing source of carbon at inter-annual scale. The observed long-term increase of atmospheric carbon sink was more attributed to feedback with below-ground source, shrinking under current warming, than to rise of above-ground net ecosystem production. This trend to reallocation of carbon to above-ground components is likely to reflect the response of cryogenic ecosystem to the warming. [ DOI ]

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